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Don’t fish blind

POSTED June 28, 2011 8:49 p.m.

Recently, while camping with my family at Lake Pardee, my son and I decided to take a walk. We ended up near the boat ramp where there were a lot of people fishing. They had just released a truck load of trout into the lake earlier that morning, so there were people catching fish all around us.

In order to get a better look at the water, I climbed up on this small rock wall that was built along the bank and was able to see a lot of fish swimming around. I even saw a few bass still on their beds along the shoreline.

As I began pointing out all the fish I was seeing, my son was having a hard time believing me. He didn’t have polarized sunglasses on, so he was having a hard time seeing anything in the water. I immediately handed him my glasses to put on and he then began to see all the fish I was seeing. Polarized sunglasses eliminate the reflection from light coming from above the water surface. Basically, the sun’s rays reflecting off the surface of water are similar to someone shining a light in your face. When you take away that light, you’re able to see the person shining the light in your face, that’s pretty much what polarized sunglasses do. You can buy a pair of polarized glasses just about anywhere now from $10, all the way into the hundreds of dollars.

Like most things, you get what you pay for. If you’re not wearing polarized sunglasses while fishing, then you’re truly fishing blind. If you’re a shallow water angler like myself,  polarized sunglasses are a must.

 

Delta Report:              

This past weekend anglers complained that they couldn’t catch a fish on a top water frog. Frog fishing is like that, sometimes they just hammer the bait without reserve and other times they just bump it. After about two or three bumps and changing color and cadence I usually abandon the frog if I haven’t caught anything. Senko’s, Spinnerbaits, and Sweet   Beavers are all catching fish right now. With the weather we have had lately look for shady spots along the bank, or spots closest to deeper water. Fish will either be looking for shade or proximity to deep moving water. If you can find shade next to a deep drop your chance of catching a big fish will be increased.   

 

New Melones Lake:

Kokanee catches continue to keep anglers busy as Trout fishing has slowed down for the summer. Anglers catching Kokanee are fishing the dam area and can be found between 40-50 feet deep. Trout have been biting for those willing to fish through the night. Night fishermen are reporting catches while soaking Power Bait below a submersible light along the main lake channels. Bass fishing is still good for angler fishing Carolina rigged baby brush hogs. Most Bass are of the smaller version with a bigger fish mixed in occasionally. Morning and evening top water fish are being caught right now on poppers and spook type lures.

 

Lake Amador:

Night fishing for bass is a favorite summertime escape for me. Lake Amador in particular is a small safe lake which with any cast can produce a personal best. An hour before the sun starts to go down Bass habitually will bring schools of shad to the surface which can create some explosive top water action. The key to catching feeding fish on the surface is patience. With a top water lure in hand, wait for the fish to start exploding on the surface and then make your cast right into the middle of the attacking fish. This technique will surely produce some of the most explosive top water action. Once the sun goes down I either toss a half ounce black spinner bait or drag 10 inch Berkeley Power worms. Then, if fishing through the night as the morning sun starts to break once again fish will be feeding on the surface, get that top water lure out and repeat the previous pattern.  

 

Lake Camanche:

Trout fishing has gotten tough as the water has warmed and the trout have gone deeper. Bass fishing in decent in the morning for anglers tossing top water baits. Catfishing is good for anglers fishing off the bank while using chicken livers.

 

Boaters Needed:

On July 17,  the 14th annual Conroy Oakley Pro Teen tournament will be held out of Russo’s Marina on Bethel Island. The purpose of the event is to introduce teens 13 to 19 years old to fishing through a professional style tournament where they will be paired up with a boater for six hours. Currently they are in need of more boaters for the event, boater’s fish for free, for more information call (925) 684-9775.

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