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EDUCATION NOTES

‘Maker Hoopla’ offers kids free, hands-on educational activities

POSTED April 10, 2018 9:57 p.m.

Stanislaus County Office of Education will hold its “Maker Hoopla” in Modesto from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Petersen Event Center, 720 12th Street, Modesto. SCOE’s Maker Hoopla is a free, hands-on, family friendly event for children (preschool to 6th grade) to “learn through doing” in a social environment.

At the Maker Hoopla children can participate in hands-on activities including: 3D Printing, Agriculture Science with New Mettle Farms, Blender Bike Slushies, Earthquake Shake Table with Stanislaus County Public Library, EV3 Lego Robotics, Fort-Building, Kindness Rocks Painting, Kinetic Sand Building, Kitchen Chemistry with MJC Chemistry Club, Monogramming, Monster Makeup with Monsters in Modesto, Musical Instrument Building, Safe Wax Painting, Space Science with Great Valley Museum, Sculpting a Habitat, Slime Making, Stick-Lits, Strawbees, STEAM Project Design, and Wearable Circuits.

The Maker Hoopla will consist of three sessions in an effort to accommodate attendees. Each session will include activities encouraging students to create and explore.

“The goal of the event is to expose elementary grade students to STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics) learning and to expand student capacity, interest, and excitement for building, constructing, creating, designing, exploring, and inventing,” said event organizer Amy Bultena.

Families are encouraged to pre-register online for one of the following sessions:

· Session 1: 9 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

· Session 2: 11 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

· Session 3: 1:15 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Registration is not required but strongly encouraged. Participants can register at: http://bit.ly/mh2018registration

For more information, call or email Amy Bultena at (209) 238-1337 or abultena@stancoe.org.

 

Denair trustees whittle superintendent choices to final 4

The Denair Unified School District board narrowed the list of applicants to become the next superintendent to four finalists at a special meeting Monday night.

Trustees also announced the names of nine employees and community members who will participate in two days of interviews this weekend that will lead to the selection of the next superintendent.

The board’s search for a replacement for Aaron Rosander has been guided by consultants from McPherson & Jacobson, who helped trustees winnow a list of 21 applicants to the final four. Rosander announced in February he will leave the district at the end of June after four and half years.

Chief Business Officer Linda Covello, the district’s lead official for the search, said applications were received from educators in Stanislaus County, other parts of California and outside the state.

Two finalists will interview with trustees as well as the stakeholder committee on Saturday and two more will do the same on Sunday. The meetings are not open to the public.

The members of the stakeholder committee are student Adrianna Snyder, community member Dennis Findley, classified employee Gayle Schell, teacher Deborah Voss, Denair High Principal Kara Backman, and parents Gerardo Retana, John Greff, Cheryl Rice and Leticia Christen.

The committee will provide input and insight about the finalists to trustees, who expect to decide on a new superintendent Sunday night. Once that choice is made, McPherson & Jacobson will conduct a final round of background checks before an offer is extended.

That person is expected to be introduced at the May 10 board meeting, with the new superintendent in place by July 1.

 

Columbia College presidential finalists selected

The Columbia College Presidential Search Committee has selected two finalists who will participate in community open forums scheduled for April 18 and 19 at Columbia College.

The finalists are listed below with forum times:

·         Dr. Santanu Bandyopadhyay – 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. April 18 in the Dogwood Forum Building. Bandyopadhyay was most recently Executive Vice President of Educational Programs and Student Services at Cypress College in Cypress, California. Before that, he was Director of Institutional Research and Planning at Cypress College. He was also previously a Budget and Policy Analyst at Ohio University. Bandyopadhyay has a Ph.D. in Higher Education from Ohio University, a MBA from Ohio University and a bachelor of science degree in Physics from Kolkata University.

·         Dr. James Todd – (9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. April 19 in the Dogwood Forum Building.

Todd was most recently Vice President of Student Services at Modesto Junior College. Before that he was a Professor of Anthropology and Academic Senate President at Modesto Junior College. Todd has a Ph.D. and M.A. in Cultural Anthropology from the University of California, Santa Cruz. He has a M.A. in Anthropology from The George Washington University, a bachelor of arts degree in Anthropology from the New College of the University of South Florida and an associates degree in General Studies from Brevard Community College.

The search committee was chaired by Dr. Melissa Raby, Vice President of Student Services, Columbia College. Initial interviews were completed April 6 and the names of the two finalists have been forwarded to Chancellor Yong and the YCCD Board of Trustees.

At the open forums, each finalist will be given an opportunity to discuss their preparation for the position, their education and leadership philosophy, concluding with a time to respond to questions from the forum attendees. The forums are open to the public and community members are warmly invited to attend.

 

MJC programs honored as statewide Strong Workforce Stars

Nineteen career education programs at Modesto Junior College have earned the California Community Colleges’ Strong Workforce Stars Recognition this spring. These programs are recognized for the success of their students as measured by increased earnings, attainment of a livable wage and employment in their industry field of study.  

Strong Workforce Stars is an annual recognition for career education programs whose graduates show significant gains in factors important for advancing social mobility.

The 2018 Strong Workforce Stars were given to career education programs throughout the state in 12 industry sectors. Those named Strong Workforce Stars met one or more of the following thresholds:

·        An increase in earnings by 50 percent or more, based on a match to the state wage file, for students who earned a certificate or degree and were last enrolled in 2015-16.

·        Attainment of the regional living wage by 70 percent or more, based on a match to the state wage file, for students who earned a certificate or degree and were last enrolled in 2015-16.

·        90 percent or more are employed in a job similar to their field of study, according to the Career Technical Education Outcomes Survey, for students who earned a certificate or degree and were last enrolled in 2014-15.- An increase in earnings by 50% or more, based on a match to the state wage file, for students who were last enrolled in 2015-16=

The MJC program receiving a Gold Star (attained threshold outcomes all three metrics) is:

• Registered Nursing: 230% increase in earnings, 84% of students attained the regional living wage and 100% of students are employed in a job similar to their field of study

The MJC programs receiving Silver Stars (attained threshold outcomes on two metrics) are:

• Mechanized Agriculture: 167% increase in earnings and 100% of students are employed in a job similar to their field of study

• Veterinary Technician: 108% increase in earnings and 100% of students are employed in a job similar to their field of study

• Respiratory Care: 98% increase in earnings and 71% of students attained the regional living wage

• Supervisory Management: 79% increase in earnings and 70% of students attained the regional living wage

• Business Operations: Management: 66% increase in earnings and 73% of students attained the regional living wage

• Marketing: 54% increase in earnings and 70% of students attained the regional living wage

• Accounting: 84% of students attained the regional living wage and 100% of students are employed in a job similar to their field of study

• Real Estate: 73% of students attained the regional living wage and 100% of students are employed in a job similar to their field of study

The MJC programs receiving Bronze Stars (attained threshold outcomes on one metric) are:

• Automotive Technology: 67% increase in earnings

• Automotive Collision Repair: 100% of students are employed in a job similar to their field of study

• Agriculture Technology and Sciences, General: 167% increase in earnings

• Animal Science: 441% increase in earnings

• Agriculture Business, Sales and Service: 193% increase in earnings

• Business Administration: 75% of students attained the regional living wage

• Child Development-Early Care and Education: 59% increase in earnings

• Office Technology-Office Computer Applications: 100% of students are employed in a job similar to their field of study

• Administration of Justice: 93% increase in earnings

• Fire Technology: 72% of students attained the regional living wage

“The Strong Workforce Program has brought much needed resources to our career technical education programs,” said MJC President Jill Stearns. “To receive Gold Star, Silver Star, and Bronze Star recognition for so many MJC programs is a wonderful recognition of the faculty who work hand in hand with advisory partners in developing and maintaining relevant, in-demand training for students.”

Career technical education encompasses 94 percent of high school students and 13 million postsecondary students in the United States and includes high schools, career centers, community and technical colleges, four-year universities and more. CTE is a major part of the solution to myriad national economic and workforce problems, such as high school dropout rates, a weakened economy, global competitiveness and massive layoffs.  At a time when opportunity for employment is critical, CTE programs in every community help ensure students are equipped with the skills to successfully enter the workforce. 

“Strong Workforce Stars career education programs are proven to help Californians increase their earning power,” said Van Ton-Quinlivan, executive vice chancellor for Workforce and Digital Futures at the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office. “With the introduction of levels this year, we are able to highlight those programs that are seeing significant results, as well as those that are on the rise toward even greater success.”

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